30 Years

Tomorrow marks my parents’ 30th wedding anniversary. Not many people have had the fortune of being raised by parents who have stayed together that long. Thank you, Mom and Dad, for picking each other wisely and teaching me the value of a strong partnership. Thank you for making my brother and me a reality and putting up with our shenanigans. We all love you dearly and wish you many more years to come!

Advertisements

End on a Good Note

Finish the day having completed something. Finish the meal with your favorite bite. Finish the conversation with a hug and a smile. Finish happy and fulfilled.

Life is full of transitions. Each step bleeds into the next. Want to increase the odds of a great next step? End the previous step on a good note and carry that sense of accomplishment forward.

Never end on a bad note. No matter how painful, it’s worth the fight to make things right. It’s worth the energy and time to end things well.

Marry the Man or Marry the Mission

I’ve seen a lot of relationships collapse because partners failed to compete with the work or passion of their significant others. Especially in Hollywood, where living the dream and working 18 hours per day takes priority over all else. There are two different kinds of people – those who live for life and those who live for their dreams. The former tends to put people first; the latter tends to put the mission first, whatever that mission may be. There’s no right or wrong, better or worse. But when you are trying to engage in an intimate relationship with another person, it is very important to identify the type of person you are with. The disconnect comes when one party invests first in the relationship and the other invests first in the mission. You can fight the disconnect all you want to. But when a person’s love is unwavering or his or her mission is unwavering, you may never win. If the mission comes first, you need to fall in genuine love with the mission. Or move on.

Relationships Must Fight To Win

Before you commit, test the integrity of your relationship. To foster an enduring connection, you must first explore the distances you can travel together (both literally and figuratively). Share the highest of highs and lowest of lows. Fail together and win together. Know the dark side. Without seeing the entire spectrum, you’re far less prepared to survive. Smarter to sequester nasty surprises before investing yourself in the long-term (or death do us part), than to face them firsthand when it’s too late. A courting period rich with peaches and rainbows can be deceptive and dangerous.

Dig deeper, push boundaries, and put up a fight – together.